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Books and Talks

Understanding dependent arising
Bodhi College cofounders Christina Feldman and Akincano Weber discussed key aspects of dependent arising, a core notion of Buddhism, in a virtual workshop offered 13 June. The workshop was co-sponsored by Bodhi College and Tricycle magazine.
The dharma of nostalgia
In a dharma talk given to the Kookaburra Sangha in Sydney, Australia, Winton Higgins explores how nostalgia is often a reactive craving for mythologised memories and public histories.
Stephen Batchelor on an ethics of uncertainty
On 9 March 2022 Stephen Batchelor gave an online talk on an ethics of uncertainty which was sponsored by Mind and Life Europe. Stephen argued that both Gotama and Socrates articulate a situational ethics that is grounded in compassion and unknowing rather than a priori moral convictions and metaphysical certainties.
Interview with Winton Higgins on his new book, ‘Revamp: writings on secular Buddhism’
Winton Higgins, a meditation teacher, member of the Tuwhiri Project editorial board, and contributor to the Secular Buddhist Network website, was interviewed by Tricycle magazine editor James Shaheen on 18 November 2021 about his new book,  ‘Revamp: writings on secular Buddhism’.
Stephen Batchelor’s dharma talks on a secular reinterpretation of the eightfold path
At Buddha-Stiftung’s fifth study retreat, which was held in October 2021, Stephen Batchelor discussed a secular reinterpretation of the Eightfold Path that is appropriate and helpful for our contemporary world.  As part of this reinterpretation, Stephen suggested a different order of the limbs of the Eightfold Path and offered a new interpretation of each limb.
Stephen Batchelor on the ‘Parable of the Snake’ and the need to reimagine Buddhism
Stephen Batchelor led a meditation and offered a dharma talk to the Community Meditation Center (CMC), an Insight meditation center based in New York City, USA.  Stephen’s talk was on the ‘Parable of the Snake,’ a sutta in which Gotama, the historical Buddha, discussed different ways of approach the dharma.
A missed opportunity: a review of ‘Secularizing Buddhism’
A new collection of essays, ‘Secularizing Buddhism: new perspectives on a dynamic tradition’, unfortunately represents a missed opportunity to explore the emergence of secular Buddhism, to critically examine its assumptions, and to provide us with an accurate snapshot of the diverse views and practices of secular Buddhists.
A review of ‘Reimagining Zen in a Secular age: Charles Taylor and Zen Buddhism in the West’
Charles Taylor’s discussion of secularity has provided secular Buddhists with important conceptual tools to avoid the false dichotomy between the ‘secular’ and ‘religious’ aspects of life. James M. Shields reviews a 2020 book by Andre van der Braak which explores the connection between Charles Taylor’s notion of secularity and Zen Buddhism.
Books and articles on secular Buddhism
One indication of the growing interest in secular Buddhism is the large number of books and articles that have been recently written on the topic or which discuss issues related to secular Buddhism.
Robert M. Ellis’ talks on his book, ‘The Buddha’s Middle Way’
In a series of seven talks based on his book, ‘The Buddha’s Middle Way: Experiential Judgement in his Life and Teaching’, Robert M. Ellis puts forward an interpretation of the Buddha as a potential inspiration for Middle Way practice, led by practical needs rather than by traditional or historical claims in Buddhism.
Book launches for Winton Higgins’s new book on secular Buddhism
Beginning 19 May 2021, four book launches were held to introduce Winton Higgins’s new book, Revamp: writings on secular Buddhism. The book is published by Tuwhiri and consists of a collection of essays on various topics related to secular Buddhism. 
A review of Winton Higgins’s ‘Revamp: writings on secular Buddhism’
Winton Higgins’s latest book, Revamp: writings on secular Buddhism, provides the best account of the history of secular Buddhism available today and identifies the core characteristics of this relatively new trend within Buddhism.  While reflecting on its key perspectives and practices, Higgins also identifies the key challenges facing secular Buddhists. 
‘Don’t Expect a Standing Ovation’: Richard Winter’s new book on 59 ‘Mind-Training’ slogans
Richard Winter presents the 59 slogans of the Tibetan teachings on ‘Mind-Training’ in a style that is familiar and accessible not just for ‘Buddhists’ but for any of us who, irrespective of systems of belief or cultural allegiances, are open to the appeal of Buddhist-inspired meditation practice, as a resource for trying to flourish in a difficult world.
A review of Lenorë Lambert’s The Buddha for modern minds: a non-religious guide to the Buddha and his teachings
Winton Higgins reviews Lenorë Lambert’s new book, The Buddha for modern minds: a non-religious guide to the Buddha and his teachings. According to Winton, the book admirably achieves its purpose of preparing the newcomer for a promising ‘first date’ with the dharma and its practice. It does so in impeccably secular terms that are securely based in the early teachings.
Tuwhiri: a secular Buddhist publishing imprint
The Tuwhiri Project is a publishing imprint which was initiated by secular dharma practitioners in Australia and Aotearoa New Zealand. As well as publishing books, Tuwhiri helped to develop the Secular Buddhist Network’s online course, Exploring a secular dharma and publishes Creative Dharma, a newsletter.