THE SECULAR BUDDHIST NETWORK

Secular Buddhists and communities worldwide

In the short time since secular Buddhism has emerged as a distinct trend, a number of communities have been set up around the world. While secular Buddhism is a global phenomenon, most secular Buddhists are found in English-speaking countries, but this is changing rapidly.


On this page you will find links to secular Buddhist communities and individuals looking to start a community around the world. If your group isn’t listed here, let us know.

RECOMMENDED READING

Upcoming events for secular Buddhists: talks and retreats

Workshops, retreats, meetings and other events of interest to secular Buddhists, and the curious

By SBN Editor


Secular Buddhist groups and communities in Europe and South America

Check out the list of secular Buddhist groups and communities in Europe and South America.

By SBN Editor


Secular Buddhist groups and communities in the USA

Check out the list of secular Buddhist groups and communities in the U.S.A.

By SBN Editor


Uluru in central Australia

Secular Buddhist groups and communities in Australia

Take a look at the secular Buddhist groups and communities in Australia

By SBN Editor


A very green looking New Zealand

Secular Buddhist groups and communities in Aoteorea New Zealand

Check out the variety of secular Buddhist groups and communities in Aotearoa New Zealand.

By SBN Editor


EXPLORE SECULAR BUDDHISM NETWORK

Bringing secular dharma practitioners together

By Ramsey Margolis


Creating community – or meditation as a contact sport

By SBN Editor


Secular Buddhist groups and communities in Aoteorea New Zealand

A very green looking New Zealand

By SBN Editor


Sylvie Vanasse on secular Buddhist sangha: admirable friendship

By Sylvie Vanasse


Sangha essentials – creating community & bonding

By Winton Higgins


Creating & maintaining a secular dharma community is not easy

By Leon Frampton


A secular Buddhist perspective on dharmic citizenship

By Winton Higgins


A “Re~Collection” on building, renewing, and sustaining sanghas

By Jennifer Hawkins